Texas Humane Heroes Resources and FAQs

Resources

Lost/Found Pets

Lost Pet: Ensure microchip information is up to date including emergency contacts & address.
Found Pet: Have the animal scanned for a microchip at your local vet or animal shelter in an effort to easily contact the owner.
Lost Pet: Ensure the issuer of your pet’s rabies certificate has your current contact information.
Found Pet: Call the issuer of the animal’s rabies tag to find owner contact information. 

Depending upon where you lost/found the animal:

Contact Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter at 512-943-3322 or Austin Animal Center at 512-978-0500 (or appropriate city/county shelter). Bell County Animal Control: 254-933-5412; Ft. Hood Animal Control: 254-287-4675; Killeen Animal Control: 254-526-5732

  • Contact the local Animal Control Department per the city or county.
  • Post colorful flyers in the area of the lost/found animal. Suggestion: Use bright colored posterboard background and full color photo. Laminate the flyer to prevent weather damage.
  • www.craigslist.com – post a Lost/Found ad in the Pet section along with multiple photos of the lost/found animal daily until the animal is returned home.
  • www.findtoto.com – a paid service that sends automated messages to your neighbors alerting them that your animal is lost.
  • Lost Pet Network:
www.lostpetusa.net

Lost Pet USA www.lostpetusa.net/home

Missing Pet Partnership is the expert in finding lost pets. In addition to a vast collection of recovery advice, they also have tips for what to do when you’ve found a stray.

Austin has a certified Missing Pet Partnership specialist trained to find lost cats for a fee.

We recommend checking your shelter every day. Austin Animal Center and Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter both display all of the found pets at their shelter online.

We also recommend posting and checking on both the Lost and Found and Pets sections of Craiglist.

Boarding

embarkly

Low-Cost Veterinary Care

Texas Humane Heroes offers low-cost spay/neuter and vaccination/microchip clinics.

Emancipet offers low-cost spay/neuter, vaccinations, and other services.

Affordable Pet Care in Cedar Park offers routine vaccines, lab work and minor illness issues.

Emergency Veterinary Care

Emergency Pet Care of Round Rock

Emergency Pet Care of Northwest Austin

After Hours Veterinary Services – Killeen

Animal Behavior Guide

Visit our Animal Behavior Guide page for detailed resources and assistance with specific behavior questions including: Introducing a new pet into your home and to other pets, excessive barking, puppy and kitten development and training, aggression, and much more.

Pet Safety Guide

Dog Training

The Schrodi Memorial Training Fund was created to help owners who can’t afford top dollar training, be able to train and keep their dogs.

Hearts and Paws has a free Home Manners Class to help manage and eliminate common dog behavior problems.

Action Pack Dog Center offers an extensive array of training, boarding, and day care options as well as free training and daycare evaluations for Texas Humane Heroes adopters.

A.D.O.P.T. is a non-profit organization founded to help increase the adoption rates of shelter dogs and lower the number of owner surrenders through proper training, behavior modification, and education.  They have a limited number of scholarships available to assist owners who cannot afford training, keep their dogs.  A.D.O.P.T. Scholarship Application.

Feral Cats and Kittens

The Austin Humane Society and Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter both have TNR (Trap, Neuter, Return) programs for feral cats. This program is an effective and humane way for communities to control the feral cat population and eventually eliminate colonies.

Other groups in the Austin and Ft. Hood areas who provide assistance with feral cats:

There is also a feral cat food bank of Austin, if you need help providing food for the ferals.

More relevent information can also be found at Austin Pets Directory.

Info on socializing feral kittens:
http://www.nycferalcat.org/info-kittenssoc.php – has videos as well
http://www.feralcat.com/taming.html

Rehome Your Pet

Before you give up on your pet, remember that most behavior problems can be solved with a little detective work, and there are a ton of resources out there to help you. Check out our Animal Behavior Guide for help with the most common behavior problems.

Books, websites, behavior counselors, and trainers are all available and eager to assist you. ASPCABehavior.org is one of the leading resource sites for animal behavior assistance. Check out dogwise.com for a list of good books on training and behavior. You can also visit your local library. Go to Dr. P’s Dog Training Library for lots and lots of links to sites dealing with all kinds of issues.

If you still feel that you need to rehome your pet, Best Friends Animal Society’s How to Find Homes for Homeless Pets, offers guidance for rehoming a pet or finding a home for a homeless pet.

In addition, a new Facebook group, CTX Positive Alternative to Shelter Surrenders, is also willing to offer assistance to people needing to surrender their pet.

Other Austin rescue groups

Austin Rescue has links to all of the rescue groups in Austin, including breed-specific groups.

FAQs

I lost my pet. Where can I look for it?

Contact and visit your municipal animal shelter, like WCRAS or Town Lake. You can check our Resources page for links to area municipal shelters. Even if your pet isn’t at one of these places, keep checking back every few days. Pets have been known to turn up in shelters weeks or even months after they disappear. Animal control officers and concerned citizens bring lost pets to the shelters so their owners can find them.

I found a stray or wild animal. Where can I take it?

All stray pets found in Williamson County should be taken to the Williamson County Regional Animal Shelter (WCRAS). By having a single place for stray animals to go, it’s more likely that an owner will be able to find their missing pet.

Baby birds and wild animals are best left alone. Do not pick up a wild animal. If one is seriously injured, sick, or threatening, you can call animal control. For more tips, advice, or assistance, you can also call Austin Wildlife Rescue, Inc. at (512) 472-WILD, or visit their website at www.austinwildliferescue.org.

I want to surrender my pet to your shelter. What do I need to know?

At this time, Texas Humane Heroes is focusing the majority of its efforts saving animals on death row from animal control facilities in Central Texas, and for this reason, will be unable to take animals from owners/finders.

Do to the high volume of animals at risk at animal control, TXHH is asking that owners/finders attempt to rehome animals on their own to avoid overburdening the shelter system.

Please go here for list of resources available to help you with your owned or found pet.

I would like to get a purebred pet. Where can I look?

Why not adopt a purebred? The Humane Society of the United States estimates about 30% of all dogs in animal shelters are purebred. Come check out the available pets at Texas Humane Heroes to see if your desired breed is here.

You can also check out a breed-specific rescue group that specializes in certain breeds. Often, the people who run these breed rescues are not only knowledgeable about their breed, but they are committed to educating potential adopters about the breed. Check our Resources page for a list of local breed rescues!

But please, don’t discount mixed pets so quickly! Mixed-breed cats and dogs are just as loving, friendly, healthy, trainable, and loyal as purebreds.

My dog/cat has behavior problems that I can't deal with. What do I do?

Before you give up on your pet, remember that most behavior problems can be solved with a little detective work, and there are a ton of resources out there to help you. Check out our Animal Behavior Guide for help with the most common behavior problems.

Books, websites, behavior counselors, and trainers are all available and eager to assist you. Check out dogwise.com for a list of good books on training and behavior. You can also visit your local library. Go to Dr. P’s Dog Training Library for lots and lots of links to sites dealing with all kinds of issues. You can also visit our Resources page to find a behavior counselor or trainer that can give you some one-on-one assistance.

What does 'no-kill' mean?

Texas Humane Heroes strives toward a “no-kill” community and follows a “no-kill” philosophy, but what does that really mean? In short, TXHH will not euthanize any adoptable cats or dogs. We also provide services that we hope will ultimately reduce the number of homeless dogs and cats in our community. We hope this will enable our entire community to become a “no-kill” community, where none of the shelters have to euthanize because of overcrowding, and every healthy pet gets a permanent home.

We’re not there yet, but with the community’s help and support – with your help and support – we believe a “no-kill” community could be a reality here in Central Texas.

How can I help Texas Humane Heroes achieve a 'No Kill' reality?

There are many things you can do to help us reach “No Kill” in Central Texas, including the following:

  • Spay or neuter your pets and encourage others to do the same! Texas Humane Heroes offers a low-cost spay/neuter clinic.
  • Adopt your next cat or dog from your local shelter. Don’t forget to check the available pets at Texas Humane Heroes!
  • Keep your pets’ registration and rabies vaccination tags on them at all times. Consider getting your pet microchipped.
  • Make sure your pet sees the vet at least once a year for a preventative checkup. Take your pet to the vet right away if you think your pet might be sick or injured.
  • Train and socialize your dog from day one. Learn about dog and cat behavior so you can understand what they are trying to tell you. If you’re having trouble dealing with your pet’s behavior, find a professional behavior counselor or trainer to help you!
  • Support Texas Humane Heroes by donating or volunteering! We depend 100% on community support to reach our goals.

How old do I need to be to volunteer?

Children must be at least 8 years old in order to volunteer with Texas Humane Heroes. Children between the ages of 8 -15 must be accompanied at all times by a parent or guardian who has also attended orientation.

How can my group or club become involved in special projects at Texas Humane Heroes?

We welcome groups for special projects! The list of “things to do” is never-ending! Please check out our Group Projects page and then email our Director Development at efehily@texashumaneherose.org and share your ideas for a project.